English

EN120: LM English

Term: Year

This course is the foundation for subsequent English courses and focuses primarily on the development of clear, concise writing and speaking. The course improves the students’ close reading skills to sharpen their precision of thinking, writing, and expression. Students focus on such qualities as word choice and literary devices as they seek to unearth the significance of literary passages. Since each assertion or claim that a student makes in writing must be supported by evidence from the text itself, students aim to integrate quotations smoothly and effectively in their critical observations. In the first semester, students work on writing individual paragraphs to build incrementally toward passage analyses, poetry explications, and longer essays written in the winter and spring terms. Some assignments afford students opportunities to practice critical thinking in creative exercises; such assignments include memorizing monologues or poems, acting out scenes from dramatic works, and writing personal essays that are linked to texts being read in class. Modeling various writing styles and modes allows students to begin fusing rather than isolating analytical and creative work as they seek their own voices. Students begin building their English Portfolio with essays that critically describe their learning process throughout the course; they will assess their own skills and knowledge as readers, writers, and students of grammar, and they will demonstrate through their portfolio work clear thinking and precise writing. The Portfolio also includes an oral component. This Portfolio will accompany them throughout their Taft English career. Texts studied in recent years include Oedipus Rex, Antigone, A Raisin In The Sun, Macbeth, Things Fall Apart, Great Expectations, Seagull Reader Stories and Poetry (anthologies). Intensive study of vocabulary and grammar facilitates the students’ development of varied diction and sound writing. Effective class participation—both in informal discussion and more formal debates and presentations—is an essential requirement of the course.


EN130: Honors LM English

Term: Year

Although similar to Lower Middle English in reading and writing objectives, the Honors Program offers greater challenges for a select group of particularly talented and dedicated Lower Middlers. With the standard course, EN130 shares the central goal of preparing students for future English courses by emphasizing the basics of clear writing, close reading, and critical thinking. However, the pace and level of sophistication of classroom participation, reading, and writing assignments are greater. The course is designed to provoke and inspire the most intellectually curious, disciplined, and creative English students. EN130 teaches writing as a deliberate process through which students learn to communicate clearly and purposefully as they find their own voices. Students increase their understanding of the structure and logic of expression through systematic study of grammar, and they learn vocabulary words in context from the literature, moving these words from passive to active vocabulary in discussions and writing. Class discussions challenge and stimulate students and encourage them to take risks. In addition, students prepare a number of oral presentations throughout the year; these may take the form of poetry recitations, dramatic monologues, or collaborative performance pieces. Readings throughout the year will include poetry, a Shakespeare play, short stories, and novels. Students are evaluated through a variety of assessments, including a portfolio of various writing pieces which they both select and reflect upon and which will accompany them into their Middle year. Admission to the course requires consent of the Department.

EN220: Mid English

Term: Year

During the Middle year of English, students spend the first semester engaged in a substantial and systematic writing workshop that focuses on discovery and enhancement of the writer's voice. Students learn to express themselves clearly, purposefully, and creatively both in class and on paper. Students read, discuss, and analyze various models--essays, editorials, and fiction by classic and contemporary writers--and examine the choices a writer makes, the writer's purpose, and the resulting effects on the audience. Students experiment with narrative, descriptive, and expository forms, and will create their own essays using the process of preparing drafts, peer editing, and revising their work. At the end of the first semester, students turn to literary analysis, applying the writing skills gleaned during the preceding months. Beginning in January with the study of Shakespeare’s sonnets and a play, they develop their critical vocabulary and enhance their understanding of the forms of literary criticism, both in discussion and in writing. Students also engage in debates, recitations, and performances, both formal and informal. In the spring, students read a substantial novel such as Jane Eyre, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, or The Inheritance of Loss, as well as shorter works as time permits. Writing during the spring culminates with a longer critical essay, which facilitates the transition to Upper Middle English. At the end of the year students construct a portfolio that demonstrates their growth as writers and thinkers, and includes as well a substantial self-reflection. As in the Lower Middle year, the development of vocabulary in context, the study of grammar as a tool for effective written communication, and the discipline of both individual and group work are major components of each student’s study.

EN230: Honors Mid English

Term: Year

Although similar to Middle English in reading and writing objectives, the Honors Program offers a challenge to a select and limited number of particularly able and dedicated Middlers. This course introduces students to classic literary works from all genres and instructs students in the composition of personal essays and literary criticism. Given that these more able students have successfully begun the development of their personal voice in writing, the course turns to the use of that voice in a variety of contexts. Consequently, it differs somewhat from the regular course in pace, level of sophistication, and reading selections. Admission to the course requires the consent of the Department.

EN323: UM English

Term: Semester 1

This two-semester course seeks to develop critical thinking skills, making students better critics of the culture responsible for the complex, often contradictory and fragmented American identity. Students analyze and explicate literary passages and, subsequently, compose persuasive extended arguments in the form of critical essays and both formal and informal oral performances. Passage analyses in the first semester focus primarily on the influence of form and rhetoric on characterization, conflict, and theme. During the second semester, critical inquiry emphasizes and further develops students’ ability to move from a focused understanding of passages to a broader and deeper understanding of common thematic ideas in the literature. Consequently, the culminating writing portfolio synthesizes critical arguments about and personal experience with the literature. First, focusing on what being an American signifies, students explore their relationship to literature by tracing a thematic through-line they regard as personally significant. They finish the portfolio with a reflection on their skills as an English student and perform a retrospective rhetorical analysis of their writing. Most of the readings—both classic and contemporary—are selected from 19th and 20th century American writers, representing a range of American experience; texts studied in recent years include The Scarlet Letter, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, a selection of short stories, The Great Gatsby, poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, and more contemporary poets, A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, A Raisin in the Sun, The Laramie Project, Walden, essays by Emerson, and Beloved. The course will also include a close study of one Shakespearean play in the winter or spring term. Student writing—both critical and creative—emerges from textual themes and student interests. In a seminar format in class discussions, students begin the process of dialogue with inquiry, bolster assertions with textual evidence and sound reasoning, and draw conclusions. In addition to critical essays, students work through performance-based assessments in three parts: an analysis of a text (e.g. poem or scene); a dramatic performance; and a reflective self-assessment. While learning to read, write, think, and speak critically and communicate persuasively, students gain knowledge of essential grammar, vocabulary, and writing skills in the context of their work. The course is designed to continue the development of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes fostered in earlier English courses.

EN324: UM English

Term: Semester 2

This two-semester course seeks to develop critical thinking skills, making students better critics of the culture responsible for the complex, often contradictory and fragmented American identity. Students analyze and explicate literary passages and, subsequently, compose persuasive extended arguments in the form of critical essays and both formal and informal oral performances. Passage analyses in the first semester focus primarily on the influence of form and rhetoric on characterization, conflict, and theme. During the second semester, critical inquiry emphasizes and further develops students’ ability to move from a focused understanding of passages to a broader and deeper understanding of common thematic ideas in the literature. Consequently, the culminating writing portfolio synthesizes critical arguments about and personal experience with the literature. First, focusing on what being an American signifies, students explore their relationship to literature by tracing a thematic through-line they regard as personally significant. They finish the portfolio with a reflection on their skills as an English student and perform a retrospective rhetorical analysis of their writing. Most of the readings—both classic and contemporary—are selected from 19th and 20th century American writers, representing a range of American experience; texts studied in recent years include The Scarlet Letter, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, a selection of short stories, The Great Gatsby, poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, and more contemporary poets, A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, A Raisin in the Sun, The Laramie Project, Walden, essays by Emerson, and Beloved. The course will also include a close study of one Shakespearean play in the winter or spring term. Student writing—both critical and creative—emerges from textual themes and student interests. In a seminar format in class discussions, students begin the process of dialogue with inquiry, bolster assertions with textual evidence and sound reasoning, and draw conclusions. In addition to critical essays, students work through performance-based assessments in three parts: an analysis of a text (e.g. poem or scene); a dramatic performance; and a reflective self-assessment. While learning to read, write, think, and speak critically and communicate persuasively, students gain knowledge of essential grammar, vocabulary, and writing skills in the context of their work. The course is designed to continue the development of the skills, knowledge, and attitudes fostered in earlier English courses.

EN403: Literature of War

Term: Semester 1

The French writer Voltaire once wrote of his contemporary government, "It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets."Such irony in the morality of war has been hotly debated from the beginning of human history, and yet war continues on in our world, as prevalent as flowers in spring.Often framed in politlcal rhetoric as a 'battle for peace,' war frequently promises the rewards of chivalry, but more frequently delivers death, suffering and psychic loss.This course will consider the literature and film of war, primarily focusing on its many contradictions and devastating effects.Texts will include The Things They Carried, All Quiet on the Western Front, Farewell to Arms, and Slaughterhouse-Five.

EN407: The Quest

Term: Semester 1

As every seeker has before, the student in this course asks: What is the good life? How can I find happiness? What duties do I owe my family, my friends, myself? How can the single man or woman integrate fully into a shared culture, retaining one’s individuality while contributing to the greater good? What obstacles will stand in the seeker’s way, and what aid will she find, on the path toward enlightenment? Should knowledge, glory, or revenge be pursued at any cost? Students may read some of the classic epics of literature as well as a variety of voices in works that focus on the theme of the quest. Texts may include Homer's Odyssey, Beowulf or Gilgamesh, Dante's Inferno, Voltaire's Candide, and Hesse's Demian. Through lively conversation, students will examine the literature of the quest and consider for themselves the worth of this physical, intellectual, moral, and spiritual endeavor.

EN417: Sexual Politics in the 21st Century

Term: Semester 1

This is a course about sex, romance, and love that would pull from sociology essays and nonfiction NPR podcasts to short stories, plays, and novels. Power couples and one night stands; first dates and soulmates. The ways in which sex and power intersect to form challenging relationships, conflicts and characters. Possible texts include: The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Gone Girl, Modern Love, House of Cards.

EN438: Literary Journalism

Term: Semester 2

“To hell with facts!” Ken Kesey writes, “We need stories!” Narrative journalism combines the best of both. In this course, students will read works by Pulitzer Prize winners and follow daily newspapers in order to study the techniques of narrative journalists. Through weekly writing assignments, students will learn how to use elements of fiction—character development, scene setting, sensory detail, dramatic tension—to engage readers in nonfiction stories. Students will learn how to write profiles, editorials, as well as traditional news stories. We will read how professional journalists approach the craft of writing for a variety of categories, from sports and arts to politics and social issues. The course will also look at interactive and supplemental story forms—including polls, Q&As, and timelines—as ways of conveying complex information to the reader. Throughout the semester, students will master editing techniques to make their writing clear, concise and compelling in ways that apply beyond the realm of journalism.

EN458: World Cinema: An Introduction

Term: Semester 2

The goal of this course is twofold: to introduce students to the visual language of cinema through intensive readings in film theory and through frequent written analyses; and to introduce students to a range of cinematic styles and subjects from beyond the more familiar realms of Hollywood and American independent filmmakers. The latter two-thirds of the course will involve weekly film screenings followed by student-led seminars based on the film and on secondary readings in theory and in criticism that places the film in a broader social / cultural context. Assessments will include weekly critical essays, a substantial research essay, and contributions to the seminar discussions as leader and participant. Films for study may include City of God (Brazil), Raise the Red Lantern (China), Panis Labyrinth (Spain), Le Quattro Volte (Italy), Breathless (France), Run Lola Run (Germany), Water (India), Nikita (France), Cinema Paradiso (Italy). The final list of films will depend on student interest and input.

EN464: Literature of Civil Disobedience

Term: Semester 2

With Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and essay, “Civil Disobedience,” at its center, this course explores the social energies created by literature and the literature created out of historical acts of civil disobedience. Upon establishing a foundational understanding of Thoreau’s philosophy, students will study some of the literature and history of the Indian independence movement, the American Civil Rights Movement, the Tiananmen Square protests in China, and the women’s movement as it extends into the 21st century. Students will study fiction, non-fiction, memoir, poetry, drama, and film. Students’ work in the course will culminate in a final project: an act of civil disobedience of their own. Students enrolled in the course will also be eligible to participate in an optional five-day trip to the civil rights trail in Birmingham, Montgomery, and Selma, Alabama at the start of Thanksgiving break. Including its service components, the trip will provide students with an on-site exploration of some of the very acts of civil disobedience that fueled tremendous social change.

EN468: Dystopian Literature

Term: Semester 2

This course asks students to train a critical eye on contemporary society. “Mother, do I trust the government?” What role do violence and torture play in the creation of political peace? How can the individual effect change in the face of Big Government, Big Corporations, Big Entertainment Media, or Big Culture? Is social control derived from force or allurement? Looking together at four novelized visions of unhealthy societies, we will search for answers to these questions. Finally, we’ll consider the political/intellectual role novelists play in a modern, liberal country. Students may read these works or these authors: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World, George Orwell, 1984, Anthony Burgess A Clockwork Orange, Vonnegut, Le Guin, Clarke, Bradbury, Asimov, Butler, Atwood, Zamyatin, Shakespeare.

EN476: People and Stories of California

Term: Semester 2

This course explores the literature of California from Native creation stories to contemporary fiction. Unlike any other state in the union, California offers a rich and unique blend of people, stories, and heritage of unparalleled diversity and complexity all within the borders of a single state. Beginning with Native American myths, the course will chronologically travel through Spanish exploration and missions, the gold rush and railroads, the growth of San Francisco and Los Angeles (including Hollywood and the birth of the entertainment industry), the Great Depression and World War II, post war racial tension, counter culture and Vietnam, and finally end with current politics and immigration policies. Possible texts, authors, and artists include Chumash origin myths, Mark Twain's Roughing It, Ansel Adams' landscapes, John Steinbeck's Cannery Row, Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, T.C. Boyle’s Tortilla Curtain, Dr. Dre, and Prop 8. The course offers historical context for each text and time period, but focuses on the literature itself to offer perspectives on the state, as well as a look at the culture, food, music, and lifestyle that has given California the reputation as a golden state, a final frontier of opportunity, fame, fortune, and sun.

EN491: Gothic Literature

Term: Semester 1

Tales of the supernatural, ghosts, demons, and monsters, are universal and timeless. For many, they help to explain the unknown and provide a sense of comfort and control amidst a seemingly mysterious and terrifying physical and psychological existence. The Gothic Literature course will examine such endless fascination with the forbidden and frightening. Students will explore gothic archetypes, Freudian psychoanalysis, gothic feminism, gothic cinema, and applications of the gothic into other genres. Possible texts and artists include selections from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, short stories from Nathaniel Hawthorne, HP Lovecraft, and Edgar Allen Poe, novels such as Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw and Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, along with films from Alfred Hitchcock, Tim Burton, and Guillermo Del Toro.

EN492: Tragedy

Term: Semester 2

Fundamental to the study of Western literature is an understanding of the idea of tragedy. This course will consider its origins with the Greeks in the writings of Aristotle, Sophocles, Aeschylus, and Plato; its evolution in the Elizabethan era as represented by Shakespeare; its present incarnation in the works of writers like Conrad, Miller, and Williams. Fundamentally, “Tragedy is the narration of self-inflicted punishment. It is ironic that, in an attempt to further his own interests, the protagonist should actually destroy them.” In studying the tragic hero we discover a kindred spirit; in his humanity we find our own.

EN493: Experiments in Writing

Term: Semester 1

Experiments in Writing is an intensive writing workshop for select students who are interested in writing about experience and exploring various genres and styles. Genres studied in the course include journalism, the personal essay, short fiction, poetry, and New Journalism. In addition to in-class writing and awareness exercises, students complete an average of three writing assignments per week. The writing exercises and assignments highlight the importance of concrete expression, evocative imagery, subtlety, editing, and rewriting. The course instructor acts as coach, editor, and constructive critic. In addition, student work is regularly critiqued by peers in class seminars and by the teacher in individual conferences. Both professional and student models are used to illustrate various writing styles. In recent years, Experiments students have published literary magazines, writing portfolios, and newspapers.

EN494: Short Story

Term: Semester 2

Raymond Carver once observed that the art of the short story is “to endow certain things—a chair, a window curtain, a fork, a stone, a woman’s earring—with immense, even startling power.” In this course we will read a comprehensive and diverse collection of short fiction, paying attention both to the craft of the short story writer as well as to the insights and themes of the stories themselves. We will ask ourselves questions such as the following: What artistic decisions do the authors make in terms of plot, character, and dialogue, and how and why are they effective? What world views do the texts contain and how are they communicated? What moments of “startling power” occur in each story? Students will write critically about the stories they read and will write their own stories as well. At the end of the term, we will have read thirty stories, will have deepened our critical and creative literary skills, and will have challenged ourselves to explore the human condition.

EN501: Modern American Drama

Term: Semester 1

This course will explore Twentieth Century American drama. The sweeping economic, political, social, and cultural changes that occurred in America in the last century influenced authors such as Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee and Eugene O’Neill. Other playwrights like Lillian Hellman and Thornton Wilder added their distinct voices to the American stage. All dealt with different aspects of “the American Dream”. This course will explore how modern American dramatists defined that dream.

EN502: Japanese Fiction and Film

Term: Semester 2

Through the exploration of Bushido (Samurai Code), individualism, filial piety, and spiritualism, the Japanese Fiction and Film course, exposing students to a wide range of Japanese authors, artists, and filmmakers, will examine Japan’s classical era, samurai age, wartime and post world war II social change. Throughout the course, students will also focus on Japan’s cross culturalism through Western appropriation of Japanese stories/values and vice versa. Possible authors and filmmakers include Murasaki Shikibu, Ueda Akinara, John Allyn, Kenji Mizogushi, and Akira Kurosawa.

EN504: Mermaids, Whales & Shipwrecks: Literature of the Sea

Term: Semester 2

Serving as an escape for some and a prison for others, the sea has influenced the imagination of writers across the globe. For centuries, writers have found the sea to be a place of wonder, reflection, and an opportunity to explore the unknown. In this course, we will read texts that explore the themes of sea voyages as a source of the adventure and self-discovery. The texts we encounter will undoubtedly have the sea serving as the setting, a body of symbolism, and a vehicle with which to explore and reflect upon the relationship between humans and nature.

EN503: Race and Gender in Hollywood Film

Term: Semester 1

As the course title would suggest, Race and Gender in Hollywood Film is a class that investigates the ways in which contemporary Hollywood cinema shapes our understanding of race and gender. We will explore and define key terms -- for example, race, racism, ethnicity, sex, gender, sexual identity, masculinity, femininity -- and use these concepts to examine the explicit as well as implicit messages conveyed by recent, popular films. This course is both reading and writing intensive, with a goal of preparing students for the types of reading and writing they will be expected to do in college. Readings will be taken from a range of critical and theoretical sources, and in weekly writing assignments students will be expected to incorporate ideas from these secondary texts in analyzing films. Viewings will include documentaries as well as five or six feature films produced in the past five years. Ultimately, we will use readings and films to explore one essential question: How do Hollywood films construct the way we think, see, feel, and act with regards to race and gender?

EN505: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Boarding School Literature

Term: Semester 1

From Old School to Testimony, writers have worked arduously to capture the unique and elite boarding school experience. The media and the public are obsessed with uncovering the perceived unbecoming and ugly underbelly of this elite world. Through studying novels, memoir excerpts, and films, we will identify and explore the archetypes associated with the boarding school narrative and how these archetypes have changed over time. We will explore the obsession with the prep school world and its coveted status. We will also examine the relationship between these schools and society, and more importantly their purpose. Do these schools provide intangible goods or an education beyond their mission statements? Who has access to these schools and why? Lastly, we will culminate the course by writing brief memoirs on our own experiences in boarding school.

EN510: Honors Mid English: Introduction to Comparative Literature

Term: Year

Introduction to Comparative Literature is an honors-level course that introduces students to issues and authors from around the world, across nationalities, languages and literary genres. The class asks students to look at familiar and unfamiliar works through a fresh lens and provides tools with which students can read their world(s). Central concerns will be honing and strengthening students’ analytical writing skills and developing creative criticism. Students will learn new methods of literary interpretation in order to read a broad range of fiction and poetry. Major texts include exile poetry and Julia Alvarez’s How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent, Shakespeare, Goëthe, Edwidge Danticat, Maryse Condé, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jhumpa Lahiri and Tsitsi Dangarembga. Students will encounter multiple perspectives and questions of equity, justice, identities, and community. This course gives students skills that will prepare them for AP Literature and for further study in Honors Comparative Literature in their Upper Mid year. Admission to the course requires the consent of the department.

EN520: Honors Comparative Literature

Term: Year

This course will focus on the Middle Eastern, Asian, and European cultures of the Mediterranean region beginning with pre-Christian Greek, Asian and Arabian cultures and working up through the development and establishment of Christianity and Islam in the Mediterranean region. As its name suggests, this course is interdisciplinary in scope, studying the cultures of the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean worlds through an exploration of the literature, religion, philosophy, art, and architecture produced within those cultures. Taught as an honors Harkness seminar, this course will entail a range of assessments, including oral presentations, analytical and creative writing projects, and collaborative performances – all of which will require students both to demonstrate an understanding of the texts and cultures in question and to apply ethical and philosophical concepts from those texts and cultures to their own lives. Cultures, topics, and texts covered will include some or all of the following: Ancient Greece (Hesiod’s Works & Days; Theogony; Sappho’s poetry); Athens in the 5th Century (Plato, Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes); Mesopotamia (The Epic of Gilgamesh); Arabic (The Qur’an); Persian (One Thousand and One Nights); Islamic art; Roman civilization (Virgil, Aeneid; Lucretius, On the Nature of Things; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Plautus; Roman architecture); Early Christianity (St. Augustine, Confessions); Spain (The Song of the Cid; Don Quixote)

EN540: Honors Humanities

Term: Year

This interdisciplinary course is a chronological introduction to some major figures and ideas of western civilization. Students explore how a seamless integration of philosophy, literature, history, the arts, and science comprises a cultural experience. As students learn about various cultures and periods, they will discuss the application of their understanding to their own lives in making responsible, informed decisions concerning philosophical, spiritual, and moral issues. Readings from the Old and New Testament, and such authors as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Dante, Chaucer, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Galileo, Voltaire, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, Freud, Einstein, and Sartre reveal the thoughts and experiences that have shaped societies and individuals over the last 3500 years. Some recurring themes in the course are the nature and use of power; the relationships between men and women and between parents and children; the nature of spiritual experience and the divine; changing perceptions of the natural world and the position of human beings in the context of nature; and the causes and consequences of the development of science and technology. Discussions of art history illustrate the historical and social contexts of the readings. Various writing projects, period tests, oral presentations, and collaborative performances enable students to demonstrate their understanding of the moral and intellectual positions represented in the material and to exercise personal critical judgment regarding the value or validity of the ideas to which they have been exposed. And periodically students are asked to form and share their own opinions about the essential questions raised in the course. A student who completes the course may, with departmental permission, use it to satisfy one semester of the English requirement. A student enrolled in three, year-long Advanced Placement courses may, with permission of the English Department, use this course to fulfill the full-year English requirement. If there are spaces available in the course, a student who cannot otherwise fit this course into his or her program may, with permission of the English Department, use this course to fulfill the full-year English requirement. Open to Seniors with departmental permission.

EN591: Independent Tutorial in English

Term: Semester 1

This is an opportunity for a student to work with a member of the Department on a project in which they share a common interest. Open to Seniors by permission of the Department Head and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

EN592: Independent Tutorial in English

Term: Semester 2

This is an opportunity for a student to work with a member of the Department on a project in which they share a common interest. Open to Seniors by permission of the Department Head and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

EN821: AP UM English

Term: Semester 1

This course is for Upper Middlers who have demonstrated exceptional ability, motivation, and achievement in previous English courses. While the fundamental objectives of this course are similar to those of EN323 and EN324, the course demands more engagement from students and sets higher standards. Focusing on 19th and 20th century American literature of all genres, students develop their skills in critical thinking, purposeful writing, and effective speaking. The curriculum features assessments that are designed to offer not only analytical experience, but also opportunities to develop both intellectual curiosity and a confident, disciplined approach to writing. Students will work both collaboratively and independently on activities related to these goals. In learning how to read nonfiction literature critically, how to write precisely and cogently, and how to think clearly and logically, students will also be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Language and Composition in May. Following the administration of the A.P. exam, students will complete the course with a final project that asks them to synthesize their ideas about the literature they have read throughout the course, examining a theme of critical and personal importance in both an oral presentation and an extended paper. Admission to this course requires permission of the English Department.

EN822: AP UM English

Term: Semester 2

This course is for Upper Middlers who have demonstrated exceptional ability, motivation, and achievement in previous English courses. While the fundamental objectives of this course are similar to those of EN323 and EN324, the course demands more engagement from students and sets higher standards. Focusing on 19th and 20th century American literature of all genres, students develop their skills in critical thinking, purposeful writing, and effective speaking. The curriculum features assessments that are designed to offer not only analytical experience, but also opportunities to develop both intellectual curiosity and a confident, disciplined approach to writing. Students will work both collaboratively and independently on activities related to these goals. In learning how to read nonfiction literature critically, how to write precisely and cogently, and how to think clearly and logically, students will also be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Language and Composition in May. Following the administration of the A.P. exam, students will complete the course with a final project that asks them to synthesize their ideas about the literature they have read throughout the course, examining a theme of critical and personal importance in both an oral presentation and an extended paper. Admission to this course requires permission of the English Department.

EN831: AP SR English Lit

Term: Semester 1

This Honors level English course is divided into two distinct, but integrated, semesters, and all students should plan to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. Students should elect this course on the basis of their strong commitment to English and their ability to excel in understanding and writing about literature. The curriculum of the course is sophisticated and demanding; more is expected of Honors students than of the typical Senior. The course includes British and other non-American literature. Consistent with the composition of the A.P. Examination, the course always studies poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction. The course requires close analytical reading and an ability to communicate an understanding of the literature with organization, clarity, and supporting textual detail. Students write both critical and personal essays and are expected to participate extensively in class discussion. Although the teachers and content of the course vary, the course always includes specific preparation for the A.P. Examination in May. Admission to either semester of the course requires the permission of the English Department.

EN832: AP SR English Lit

Term: Semester 2

This Honors level AP English course is divided into two distinct, but integrated, semesters, and all students should plan to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. Students should elect this course on the basis of their strong commitment to English and their ability to excel in understanding and writing about literature. The curriculum of the course is sophisticated and demanding; more is expected of Honors students than of the typical Senior. The course includes British and other non-American literature. Consistent with the composition of the A.P. Examination, the course always studies poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction. The course requires close analytical reading and an ability to communicate an understanding of the literature with organization, clarity, and supporting textual detail. Students write both critical and personal essays and are expected to participate extensively in class discussion. Although the teachers and content of the course vary, the latter part of the course includes specific preparation for the A.P. Examination in May. After the A.P. exam, the course focuses on various forms of creative writing. As in all senior electives in the spring semester, one significant assignment for this course will be a project that incorporates the students' portfolio work through their previous years at Taft and that asks the students to reflect on their learning in English and the extent to which they have developed the skills, attitudes, and habits of mind the English Department sets as its goal to develop. Admission to either semester of the course requires the permission of the English Department.

EN993: Honors Independent Tutorial in English

Term: Semester 1

This is an opportunity for a student to work with a member of the Department on a project in which they share a common interest. Open to Seniors by permission of the Department Head and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

EN994: Honors Independent Tutorial in English

Term: Semester 2

This is an opportunity for a student to work with a member of the Department on a project in which they share a common interest. Open to Seniors by permission of the Department Head and the Dean of Academic Affairs.